New From Marc DiNero feat. WunTayk Timmy “Don’t Do That”

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Marc DiNero

Flow: it’s the mark of the impeccable MC and the true master of the art of hip-hop vocals. Flow picks up the listener and carries them along from verse to verse; flow is effortless, fluid, electrifying, unmistakable. Flow is what Marc DiNero has got, and every time he steps to the microphone, he puts his distinctive relationship to rhythm on display. “Don’t Do That,” his latest single, is brilliantly produced and expertly mixed, and it’s got a great hook; nevertheless, it’s DiNero’s flow that makes the song undeniable. The moment he starts to rap, he’s got you, and he doesn’t let go until the last beat stops resonating.

If you’re from Louisville, Kentucky, nothing we’re telling you is news to you. In his hometown, Marc DiNero is already recognized as a man on the move — a rapper with world-class talent and the charisma of a star. “Don’t Do That” is the track that’s poised to catapult DiNero from regional recognition to national acclaim: a relentless, muscular, swaggering rap track that already hits like an underground classic. DiNero raps with absolute confidence and a sly sense of humor, too, and he makes an ideal tag team partner for his talented friend WunTayk Timmy. A savage punchline emcee, the Louisville-based Timmy is well known for his fiery collaborations with Bryson Tiller, but he’s brought his A-game to his session with Marc DiNero, too. The two vocalists’ styles compliment each other perfectly — DiNero is forceful and precise, excitable but always controlled, while WunTayk Timmy is relaxed and dreamy, smoky, and hypnotic. Their chemistry is thrilling, and they demonstrate that flow can take many shapes and follow many channels. But if you’ve got it (and these two do), it’s impossible to miss.

Marc DiNero and WunTayk Timmy take turns in front of the camera in Steve Squall’s energetic clip for “Don’t Do That.” Just as they do on the track, the two rappers showcase their complementary styles: DiNero looks fresh in his bright red t-shirt and Sox cap with the gold sticker still on the bill, while Timmy is all in black and backlit, with his own hat turned around backward. When they get together, it’s a party — literally. There’s a balloon drop and dancers in motion, and there’s even a long-haired clown. And sure, he’s a walking example of what not to do and the antithesis of the cool that the MCs display. He’s still part of the show, and when the scene is as colorful as this, who could blame him?

How has your upbringing in Peoria, Illinois, and your current residency in Louisville, Kentucky, shaped your musical journey and unique sound?

Peoria is where it all began for me. Music was really the first thing I attached myself to as a kid. I can remember memorizing entire Tupac songs, mimicking DMX and Jay Z. Being in tune with everything that was released and loving that feeling of hearing new music just so I can have it on repeat. I began writing songs when I was around 9 or 10. At that time, I didn’t have a sound or pattern to how I did things. I was just trying to rhyme really. My upbringing was challenging but I don’t look to use any of my life circumstances as excuses. Not having my parents growing up allowed me to develop gifts, one of those gifts is being an artist. I had to do something with my thoughts and emotions as a child. So I learned to put them in songs and poems. I had music that I naturally gravitated toward. I always admired artist that could tell stories and give lyrical direction through music. I believe listening to certain artist and studying the art of rap and rhyme patterns and understanding syllables has helped me become the artist that I am today.

Louisville is considered to be my second home. This is where I began my professional music career moving independently. I have always made music and music has always been a part of me. I learned how to record and spent several nights in the studio as an early teen. I consider everything that I have experienced to be vital in the making of who Marc DiNero has become, I believe making music is one of my true purposes in my life. Both Louisville and Peoria has played important roles in that process.

What inspired you to start creating and producing rap and hip-hop music, and what was your inspiration for “Don’t Do That”?

As I mentioned above, music has always been important to me. I think the biggest inspirations for why I create music is Jay-z, Timberland, DMX and Kanye. Those were the artist I grew up listening to as a young kid. They had the biggest influence on why I started rap. There are more inspirations that I can think of that has kept the fire burning inside me to keep creating like J-Cole, Kendrick, Nipsey and Rick Ross but each play a part as to why I started and decided to continue down this road of being an artist.

The story of how “Don’t Do That” came about is actually from me telling the shit to my kid. I actually say this phrase quite a bit when I talk to my homies as well. It came about when freestyling in my car over the instrumental with my baby girls in the back seat. I was playing a pack of beats my producer NES sent me while I was in the car driving them to the park. I may have just said “Don’t Do That” to one of them and then I just start saying it over the beat. I made that shit the hook after saying “Na Na Don’t Do That” like 50 times with a rhythm and then I wrote first half of the verse in less than 5 minutes freestyling in the car. I will have to say having my girls in the car with me may have influenced the topic of the record.

When did you realize you wanted to pursue a career in music, and how have you stayed motivated and continued to drive your dream forward through your latest releases?

I’mma have to say in 2018, I had a vision of taking music to another level. I knew if I was going to pursue music I was going to have to treat the shit like a legit business. I had to become a scholar and a businessman in a changing industry. It became less about being talented in music and more about being knowledgeable on how to wear multiple hats all while being an artist. I definitely have hit bumps in the road with staying motivated because the hill gets steeper as you keep going. Being self funded and trying to figure out ways to stand out in an oversaturated market has been one of the bumps in the road but you have stay focused on the end goal. At the end of the day, real music is always going to cut through the BS.

How did your collaboration with WunTayk Timmy come to be? What perks came with combining each of your strengths and talents together?

As far as working with WunTayk Timmy. In my personal opinion, WunTayk is one of the top lyricist in the Louisville area not including myself. I respect his wordplay and approach to music. This is our second song that we collaborated on in the last two years. I felt that this was a good record to continue and build on that combination and create a super collab from the Louisville area. I definitely think that we were able to accomplish what I set out to do. Put two contrasting styles together and create a bop type record with a catchy phrase and bring a lyrical approach to it. I don’t think this will be the last record we work on together. I think the people enjoy the collaboration.

What was your artistic vision for the “Don’t Do That” track and music video? How did you put your vision into effect in the video, and what do you want audiences to take away from it?

After creating this record, I immediately felt that it could be a fun TIK TOK style record. “Don’t Do That” is a heavily used phrase but I am still providing a message in the lyrics. Primarily speaking on the artist doing anything to get into the industry. I brought an aggressive energetic approach to my delivery speaking on some of the things I feel niggas shouldn’t do. I spoke on my work and how I put in more work than most rap artist independently. Being in my position, I feel a mixture of love and hate. Hate comes from the ones I wouldn’t expect. I have witnessed giving support to people who won’t do the same in return. So, I made a statement by saying “I’m sick of you niggas approaching me, I’m not coaching you, you opposing me, you not close to me, you not over me.” So, I hope that people can have fun listening to a catchy hook with dope production as well as hear me do what I feel I do best at and that’s provide a lyrical approach without making shit too complicated.

As far as the video, one thing I knew is that I wanted to incorporate dancers in this visual. I wanted to work with some videographers that could help bring that vision together. I seen bright colors when I thought about what the video would look like and that somewhat eerie sound in the beat gave me the vision of incorporating the clown. I always try to think of way to make really good music videos on a realistic budget. The competition of creativity against bigger budget industry videos makes it tough but I still think it’s doable with the right people on your team.

Follow Marc DiNero:

http://www.marcdinero.com
https://www.facebook.com/marcdinero32
https://twitter.com/marc_dinero
https://www.instagram.com/marc_dinero/

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